The first modern Jew
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The first modern Jew Spinoza and the history of an image by Daniel B. Schwartz

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Published by Princeton University Press in Princeton, NJ .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Identity,
  • Jewish learning and scholarship,
  • Jews,
  • Intellectual life,
  • Influence,
  • Jewish philosophy,
  • History

Book details:

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references (p. [247]-264) and index.

StatementDaniel B. Schwartz
Classifications
LC ClassificationsB3998 .S39 2012
The Physical Object
Paginationxv, 270 p. :
Number of Pages270
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL25361250M
ISBN 100691142912
ISBN 109780691142913
LC Control Number2011942572
OCLC/WorldCa761851054

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The First Modern Jew: Spinoza and the History of an Image - Kindle edition by Schwartz, Daniel B.. Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets. Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading The First Modern Jew: Spinoza and the History of an Image.5/5(2). Daniel Schwartz' new and first book, "The First Modern Jew: Spinoza and the History of an Image" is the most recent study that examines the relationship of Spinoza to Judaism. More precisely, as the subtitle of the book points out, Schwartz is concerned with the history of studies of Spinoza in the Jewish community over the years, more than Cited by: 5. The First Modern Jew provides a riveting look at how Spinoza went from being one of Judaism's most notorious outcasts to one of its most celebrated, if still highly controversial, cultural icons, and a powerful and protean symbol of the first modern secular Jew. The First Modern Jew provides a riveting look at how Spinoza went from being one of Judaism's most notorious outcasts to one of its most celebrated, if still highly controversial, cultural icons, and a powerful and protean symbol of the first modern secular by: 5.

The last two centuries have witnessed a radical transformation of Jewish life. Marked by such profound events as the Holocaust and the establishment of the state of Israel, Judaism's long journey through the modern age has been a complex and tumultuous one, leading many Jews to ask themselves not only where they have been and where they are going, but what it means to be a Jew in today's world.3/5(2). 12/9/ PM FroM THe HeiGHTS oF MoUnT ScoPUS reported to have taken place on the hallowed heights of Mt. Scopus andCited by: 5. Daniel Schwartz' new and first book, "The First Modern Jew: Spinoza and the History of an Image" is the most recent study that examines the relationship of Spinoza to Judaism. More precisely, as the subtitle of the book points out, Schwartz is concerned with the history of studies of Spinoza in the Jewish community over the years, more than 5/5(2). The First Modern Jew provides a riveting look at how Spinoza went from being one of Judaism's most notorious outcasts to one of its most celebrated, if still highly controversial, cultural icons, and a powerful and protean symbol of the first modern secular : Princeton University Press.

  The First Modern Jew – Spinoza and the History of an Image By Daniel B. Schwartz Princeton University Press - £ Spinozism was not a break from Judaism, but its truest expression. Regardless of where one stands so far as Baruch Spinoza being The First Modern Jew is .   Given the many different life-worlds in which reclaiming a Jewish Spinoza as the first or prototypical modern Jew played a significant role in grounding a modern Jewish identity over and against a hegemonic traditional one, Schwartz selects four moments that vary in time, place, language, and religious observance/notion of religion: s Germany, s Galicia, s Palestine, and s. Get this from a library! The first modern Jew: Spinoza and the history of an image. [Daniel B Schwartz] -- "Pioneering biblical critic, theorist of democracy, and legendary conflater of God and nature, Jewish philosopher Baruch Spinoza () was excommunicated by the Sephardic Jews of .   The “fashioning of Spinoza into a symbol,” Schwartz emphasizes, was “initially left to non-Jews” (p. 20). Only with the rise of the modern Jew in the mid-eighteenth century, as epitomized by Moses Mendelssohn, did this change. The book provides a great deal of evidence for what the author refers to as “the cult of Spinoza.”Author: Adam S. Ferziger.