Bridging the divide between aboriginal peoples and the Canadian state
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Bridging the divide between aboriginal peoples and the Canadian state

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Published by Centre for Research and Information on Canada in Montréal, Qué .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Cairns, Alan.,
  • Indians of North America -- Canada -- Government relations.

Book details:

Edition Notes

SeriesCRIC papers -- 2
ContributionsCentre for Research and Information on Canada.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsE92.C23 B75 2001
The Physical Object
FormatElectronic resource
Pagination25 p.
Number of Pages25
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL22236630M

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